WomenWalking

Cherish the Moments of Grace

December. A time and place that felt so away and yet seemed to arrive in a flash.
December. This last precious month of 2018.

Pause in the moment. Feel the poetry in the movement as you walk.  Discover the grace that infuses your life.  Dive deep into yourself and revel in the who in you, the magnificent, wonderful, uniquely beautiful you.

Pause as you take time to notice the small stuff:

Walking the Friendship Path

Have you ever heard of the Friendship Bench?

The Friendship Bench is a big beautiful idea created by a small girl that has become a reality. Acacia Woodley thought of the Friendship Bench as a special place on a school playground where a child can go when they want to feel safe and to have someone to talk to. For more on Acacia…

Acacia goes and speaks at schools about the Friendship Bench and when she spoke at one school, the principal went over to her and “stood there for a moment to gather himself before he said ‘I finally get it, for so many years I have

Confessions of a Die Hard Walker

One of the best things about being self-employed is working for yourself. ha! But there’s a flip side to that. When I first started this company, I didn’t know s**t.

I’ve stumbled and bumbled over many hills and dales. One of the said hills (or it might have been a dale!), was the error in judgment that why wouldn’t anyone want to walk, anytime, anyplace. Just because I thought walking any time is good for you, everyone would feel the same way. I’ve learned many things, one of them that life is different for everyone and it’s important to respect this for others. Figuring out that walking doesn’t always feel good, came at a hard price.

Walking the Kortum Trail

The 1972 Coastal Initiative was a landmark in coastal protection for California (and the US) as an expression by the public of their devotion to this magnificent coastline of California.

The Kortum Trail, so named in honor of Bill Kortum, a dedicated advocate on behalf of public access to the California coastline, is a small section in Sonoma County of the California Coastal Trail (CCT).  The path runs parallel to, and in between, Highway 1 and the Pacific Ocean, from Goat Rock Beach to Wright’s Beach, with Shell Beach in between.

The state park is a series of sandy beaches that are separated by rocky 100-foot bluffs and headlands. The craggy coastline includes secluded coves, reefs, fertile tidepools, rugged headlands, natural rock arches, sand dunes, and wildflower-covered meadows.

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The Thing About Walking

A while back, we had a blog post that used the term, “I lose myself and find myself,” relating to the experience of being outside for a walk.  The other day, listening to Garnette Cadogan, author and walker, speak about walking, I heard him say, “I lose myself and find myself.” Screeching to a halt, “Wait, What??? Really?” Could it be that this man totally relates to walking the way I do? I wanted to know more. The race was on to try to find a way to write to him and talk to him about it.

Here’s the thing about walking: most of us walk, many of us walk and run for

West County Trail

We use this particular trail when we want to go easy and be transported by sweetness of cutting through farmlands and open space. We always begin our walk across from the Post Office in downtown Graton, an easy meeting place.  If we walk from Graton to Forestville, we’ll cover four miles.

We’ll pass through farms, vineyards, and open spaces. Our first jump off the trail happens when we walk west less than a quarter of a mile along Green Valley Road, but once we drop back on the trail, we cross the bridge and enter the wetlands. The temperature seems to drop under the trees and we are greeted by bird song and buzzing pollinators. We’ve spotted bobcats, quails, mourning

A Walk at Point Reyes

The land jutting out between Tomales Bay and the Pacific Ocean feels as if you’re walking on a land bridge carved by time, whale songs and sky.

When you first see a Tulle Elk, especially if you’re use to smaller and more delicate ungulates like our local mule deer, your mind might wander to more substantial creatures. Camel, you might think. The the real treat of walking in Pt Reyes in that you’re in a reserve and the animals know it. It’s easy to see a coyote, fox, weasel, and an array of raptors on any given day. Likely the moment you have parked you will have seen something miraculous; owl pellets under a cypress tree, a fox peering past you, a raven cutting the sharp wind, the low flying Northern Harriers, who the old timers affectionately call Swamp Hawks. You might also see scientists, naturalists and professional photographers.

Pierce Point Ranch

Many folks call it Pierce Point Ranch, named after the largest of four ranches in the 1800s, which made use of the Point Reyes peninsula. Prior to the ranching settlements, the Miwoks were stewards of this land, although this particular stretch was far too windy for villages. Some just call it the Point, which is as visceral a name as one could acquire. The land cuts north, flanked by the Pacific and Tomales Bay; it’s as if you’re walking on a land bridge carved by time, whale songs and sky. I can’t help but think of it as the Tulle Elk Reserve, and indeed this is one of the only places that you can see these great beasts that were the region’s dominant grazers until the ranchers came in and nearly wiped them out. Sensibility and 1970’s environmentalism won out, and eventually they were reintroduced and protected.
When you first see a Tulle Elk, especially if you’re used to smaller and more delicate ungulates like our local mule deer,

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Details in the Landscape

West County Regional Trail

Maybe it’s the slanted light cutting through the willows of the Atascadero Marsh Ecological Reserve, or perhaps it’s the call of geese fading across the spring evening sky, but there is something inherently nostalgic about this four-mile long rail-to-trail stretch of the West County Regional Trail.

We use this particular trail when we want to go easy and be transported by sweetness of cutting through farmlands and open space. We always begin our walk across from the Post Office in downtown Graton, an easy meeting place.  If we walk from Graton to Forestville, we’ll cover four miles.

We’ll pass through farms, vineyards, and open spaces. Our first jump off the trail happens when we walk west less than a quarter of a mile along Green Valley Road, but once we drop back on the trail, we cross the bridge and enter the wetlands.

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A New Sense of Belonging

I am your average woman in her early fifties. I work full time and love what I do, but not how much I do it. I have been on the same street in my peaceful neighborhood for more than 15 years, I know my neighbors well.  I have a comfortable home that even feels spacious now that my children have moved out, but there is a silence some days that I don’t easily recognize. Over the years, my friends have married, had children, some divorced, some widowed, all at different times. None of us stayed in sync with our life stages like we once thought we would. I never thought that I would one day be faced with a common yet unspoken dilemma for women my age- I was lonely and to be honest, I was feeling a little trapped.

And it wasn’t the type of lonely or trapped feelings that would compel me towards romantic relationship. On the contrary, I missed feminine camaraderie that seemed so easy to come by in my younger years. I have friends, lots of them, I just don’t get to see them very much due to demanding schedules. When I saw WomenWalking on Facebook, it suddenly clicked. I wanted to be outside, with women, walking. I wanted to take in new sites and sounds and places, I just didn’t have friends who could do this with me.

Really, the premise is brilliant.